A Little Bit of Journalism

by 38 Concordia graduate diploma students

Season’s End…

This is a short documentary/report that Steven and I made about the Concordia Stingers baseball team. Produced by CUTV (Concordia University Television)

Part 1

Part 2

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October 15, 2009 Posted by | People, TV | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

‘A different breed of people’

July 23, 2009
Ball hockey players: ‘a different breed of people’
In the warm sun on a Sunday afternoon, Leo Donovan hoisted his unnaturally small hockey bag over his shoulder as he walked into the inconspicuous Le Rinque Arena and Sports Bar on chemin de la Cote-de-Liesse. Donovan’s FW Legends, in light blue, faced off against the Leftovers, in yellow jerseys, in what promised to be a good ball hockey game between the top two teams in the NABHL – Not Another Ball Hockey League.
In the first 15 minute period, running time, the even back and forth playing ended with the Leftovers leading 3-1. The momentum changed, however, as the Legends scored six goals in the second period, four within the last two minutes. The Legends won 10-3.
The second and third periods were full of great passing plays by the Legends. Donovan’s line accounted for five goals, most from passes fed across the crease by Adrian Humphreys to the waiting Francois Courion. Donovan scored with a nifty backhand on a pass from Courion.
The differences between ball and ice hockey were immediately apparent. With no blue lines there are only two zones and no offside rule. The refs have interesting techniques to keep out of the way. One ref jumped up and grabbed the top of the glass to hoist himself up and stand on the ledge.
“Ball hockey players are a difference breed of people,” said Jordan Topor, Legends player and co-owner of the almost two-year-old NABHL. “Ice hockey refs don’t enjoy reffing ball hockey. They get less respect.
“The players’s knowledge of the game is less than ice hockey players, and they think they can convince the ref to change the call,” sair Topor.
“It’s harder to deke,” said Chris Cormier, manager of the FW Legends. “You can cut easier on the ice.”
All of the players wear gloves and most wear either soccer or hockey shin pads strapped to their legs in various ways. A few wear mouthguards and only one wore a helmet.
“I don’t want to wear a helmet, but it’s a bit sketchy,” said Donovan, the youngest player on the team at 19, and one of the only players still playing junior-level organized hockey.
“I’ve seen people get their teeth knocked out.”
Even with little equipment, players show no mercy. They run hard into the boards and it can be “a bit chippy sometimes,” said Cormier. Big Legends defenseman Jason Clement fended off three yellow players against the boards after a rush, which ended in a mini shoving match after the whistle in the second period. The game was pretty clean, however, with only four 90 second penalties, mostly in the third.
Topor and Josh Naygeboren’s NABHL is quite the success. Their website, http://www.nabhl.com shows player and team statistics, top scorers, and suspensions, which the players enjoy. The two owners/players are looking to expand to another venue, said Topor after the game.
“We saw a huge need,” said Topor. “Before us, the only time people could play in a rink was in the summer.” Topor and Naygeboren put together the NABHL comprising of three seasons in a facility built specifically for ball and roller hockey with real boards, glass, and a specially made floor and smaller sized rink.
“It’s more about finesse because there isn’t much room,” said Cormier. “You have to rely on the team more and know where everyone is because you have less room to move around.”
Both Cormier and Donovan still prefer ice hockey but devoted ball hockey players take their game seriously. It is not just another kind of hockey but a sport unto itself.

July 23, 2009

Ball hockey players: ‘a different breed of people’

by Johanna Donovan

In the warm sun on a Sunday afternoon, Leo Donovan hoisted his unnaturally small hockey bag over his shoulder as he walked into the inconspicuous Le Rinque Arena and Sports Bar on chemin de la Cote-de-Liesse. Donovan’s FW Legends, in light blue, faced off against the Leftovers, in yellow jerseys, in what promised to be a good ball hockey game between the top two teams in the NABHL – Not Another Ball Hockey League.

In the first 15 minute period, running time, the even back-and-forth playing ended with the Leftovers leading 3-1. The momentum changed, however, as the Legends scored six goals in the second period, four within the last two minutes. The Legends won 10-3.

The second and third periods were full of great passing plays by the Legends. Donovan’s line accounted for five goals, most from passes fed across the crease by Adrian Humphreys to the waiting Francois Courion. Donovan scored with a nifty backhand on a pass from Courion.

The differences between ball and ice hockey were immediately apparent. With no blue lines there are only two zones and no offside rule. The refs have interesting techniques to keep out of the way. One ref jumped up and grabbed the top of the glass to hoist himself up and stand on the ledge.

“Ball hockey players are a different breed of people,” said Jordan Topor, Legends player and co-owner of the almost two-year-old NABHL. “Ice hockey refs don’t enjoy reffing ball hockey. They get less respect.

“The players’s knowledge of the game is less than ice hockey players, and they think they can convince the ref to change the call,” sair Topor.

“It’s harder to deke,” said Chris Cormier, manager of the FW Legends. “You can cut easier on the ice.”

All of the players wear gloves and most wear either soccer or hockey shin pads strapped to their legs in various ways. A few wear mouthguards and only one wore a helmet.

“I don’t want to wear a helmet, but it’s a bit sketchy,” said Donovan, the youngest player on the team at 19, and one of the only players still playing junior-level organized hockey.

“I’ve seen people get their teeth knocked out.”

Even with little equipment, players show no mercy. They run hard into the boards and it can be “a bit chippy sometimes,” said Cormier. Big Legends defenseman Jason Clement fended off three yellow players against the boards after a rush, which ended in a mini shoving match after the whistle in the second period. The game was pretty clean, however, with only four 90 second penalties, mostly in the third.

Topor and Josh Naygeboren’s NABHL is quite the success. Their website, http://www.nabhl.com shows player and team statistics, top scorers, and suspensions, which the players enjoy. The two owners/players are looking to expand to another venue, said Topor after the game.

“We saw a huge need,” said Topor. “Before us, the only time people could play in a rink was in the summer.” Topor and Naygeboren put together the NABHL comprising of three seasons in a facility built specifically for ball and roller hockey with real boards, glass, and a specially made floor and smaller sized rink.

“It’s more about finesse because there isn’t much room,” said Cormier. “You have to rely on the team more and know where everyone is because you have less room to move around.”

Both Cormier and Donovan still prefer ice hockey but devoted ball hockey players take their game seriously. It is not just another kind of hockey but a sport unto itself.

July 30, 2009 Posted by | People, Print | , , , , , | 1 Comment