A Little Bit of Journalism

by 38 Concordia graduate diploma students

The Ultimate Donation

My last assignment for my TV class. We had to do a report on the theme of death. I went up to McGill’s Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry building to talk to some students and a professor about the program of donating your body to science. What it’s all about and what it’s like being a first year medical student working on these donated bodies.

This is also posted on my blog.

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April 10, 2010 Posted by | TV | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bowling for Miracles

I had to put together a TV package on the theme of miracles. A friend of mine was putting together a great fundraiser and I thought, what’s more miraculous than babies who survive even when they’re born super early or who for some reason don’t seem like they’re going to make it?

This is also posted on my blog.

March 16, 2010 Posted by | TV | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wiihab, yes please!

July 6, 2009
Rehab, no thanks. Wiihab, yes please!
In a bright room called the Solarium at the Mackay Rehabilitation Centre and elementary school in NDG, the Wii console has to be locked up when not in use. “We have a problem with all the kids wanting to play it whenever they come in,” said Maria Angulo, a phsyiotherapist at the school.
Physical and occupational therapists at Mackay have been incorporating the Wii, donated by Nintendo, into the children’s therapy for a year. They use the technology to work on balance, range of motion, strengthening and fine motor control, to name a few, in a fun and new way.
“The idea is to give the kids another possibility to exercise, although they’ don’t think they’re exercising,” said Angulo. “It’s an alternative to formal or routine therapy and we are having really good results.”
The therapists assess the children and create a plan with particular goals to work on through the Wii. Most of the children who they work on have cerebral palsy, a condition marked by problems with the central nervous system. “It’s not a progressive disease but they can deteriorate over time if not treated,” said Angulo. Other children who benefit from Wiihab are those with neuromuscular diseases and spinal cord problems such as myelomeningocele, a defect that happens in the development of the central nervous system.
Not all the children at Mackay can use the Wii; it depends on the severity of their impairment. “They do need to have a certain intellectual level to use the Wii,” said Angulo.
“It’s not just that they can improve in one area of their physical abilities,” said Angulo. “It’s also the idea of playing a sport. It increases body image and self-esteem.”
Angulo and other therapists found out about the Wii as a tool for therapy from newspapers. There are many articles and forums and even a blog about WiiHab or Wiihabilitation on the internet, such as http://www.wiihabilitation.co.uk and http://wiihabtherapy.blogspot.com.
“A lot more people are involved and interested,” said Marianne Dutil, a Therapeute en Réadaptation Physique at Mackay. Some therapists, not being of the Nintendo generation, still shy away from the unfamiliar technology. “The kids will show you what you don’t know,” laughed Dutil.
Wiihab can be used for many disabilities, spinal cord injuries and other traumas. “One of our reverse integrated kids had a fracture,” said Angulo, speaking of one of the able-bodied students that can attend Mackay for up to two years. “We used the Wii to help strengthen his arm after the cast was removed, but we prioritize use of the Wii for the kids with the real need.”
Both Angulo and Dutil attended a seminar put on by the Institut de réadaptation de Montréal (IRM) in May. Jean-François Lemay, a physiotherapist with the IRM, is conducting research comparing the results from Wii therapy to the results from therapy with their more sophisticated machines. “The Wii as a therapy tool is working really well,” said Angulo. “I hope we will have the results from the research and be able to know if we are doing the right thing and see if the Wii can be reliable.”
There are still obstacles to using the technology in therapy. When using Wii Fit, it is difficult for those with standing balance problems to get onto the platform said Dutil. “The Wii tells them to stop fidgeting but they just don’t have postural control so their weight keeps changing.” Mackay therapists have had to create homemade adaptations to the Wii.
With Wiihabilitation’s growing popularity, there may be a market for adapted Wii consoles and equipment for therapy uses.

July 6, 2009

Rehab, no no no! Wiihab, yes please!

by Johanna Donovan

In a bright room called the Solarium at the Mackay Rehabilitation Centre and elementary school in NDG, the Wii console has to be locked up when not in use. “We have a problem with all the kids wanting to play it whenever they come in,” said Maria Angulo, a phsyiotherapist at the school.

Physical and occupational therapists at Mackay have been incorporating the Wii, donated by Nintendo, into the children’s therapy for a year. They use the technology to work on balance, range of motion, strengthening and fine motor control, to name a few, in a fun and new way.

“The idea is to give the kids another possibility to exercise, although they don’t think they’re exercising,” said Angulo. “It’s an alternative to formal or routine therapy and we are having really good results.”

The therapists assess the children and create a plan with particular goals to work on through the Wii. Most of the children who they work on have cerebral palsy, a condition marked by problems with the central nervous system. “It’s not a progressive disease but they can deteriorate over time if not treated,” said Angulo. Other children who benefit from Wiihab are those with neuromuscular diseases and spinal cord problems such as myelomeningocele, a defect that happens in the development of the central nervous system.

Not all the children at Mackay can use the Wii; it depends on the severity of their impairment. “They do need to have a certain intellectual level to use the Wii,” said Angulo.

“It’s not just that they can improve in one area of their physical abilities,” said Angulo. “It’s also the idea of playing a sport. It increases body image and self-esteem.”

Angulo and other therapists found out about the Wii as a tool for therapy from newspapers. There are many articles and forums and even a blog about WiiHab or Wiihabilitation on the internet, such as http://www.wiihabilitation.co.uk and http://wiihabtherapy.blogspot.com.

“A lot more people are involved and interested,” said Marianne Dutil, a Therapeute en Réadaptation Physique at Mackay. Some therapists, not being of the Nintendo generation, still shy away from the unfamiliar technology. “The kids will show you what you don’t know,” laughed Dutil.

Wiihab can be used for many disabilities, spinal cord injuries and other traumas. “One of our reverse integrated kids had a fracture,” said Angulo, speaking of one of the able-bodied students that can attend Mackay for up to two years. “We used the Wii to help strengthen his arm after the cast was removed, but we prioritize use of the Wii for the kids with the real need.”

Both Angulo and Dutil attended a seminar put on by the Institut de réadaptation de Montréal  (IRM) in May. Jean-François Lemay, a physiotherapist with the IRM, is conducting research comparing the results from Wii therapy to the results from therapy with their more sophisticated machines. “The Wii as a therapy tool is working really well,” said Angulo. “I hope we will have the results from the research and be able to know if we are doing the right thing and see if the Wii can be reliable.”

There are still obstacles to using the technology in therapy. When using Wii Fit, it is difficult for those with standing balance problems to get onto the platform said Dutil. “The Wii tells them to stop fidgeting but they just don’t have the postural control so their weight keeps changing.” Mackay therapists have had to create homemade adaptations to the Wii.

With Wiihabilitation’s growing popularity, there may be a market for adapted Wii consoles and equipment for therapy uses.

July 29, 2009 Posted by | Print | , , , | Leave a comment