A Little Bit of Journalism

by 38 Concordia graduate diploma students

Congratulations!

Congrats Dips! What an interesting year it has been. I hope you continue to post your work on this blog even when you’re off working and doing amazing things. Post links here so we can all see what you’re doing in TV, Radio, Print and Online.

Good luck in all your endeavours! I’m sure we’ll be seeing and your names and faces in media all over the world.

April 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ultimate Donation

My last assignment for my TV class. We had to do a report on the theme of death. I went up to McGill’s Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry building to talk to some students and a professor about the program of donating your body to science. What it’s all about and what it’s like being a first year medical student working on these donated bodies.

This is also posted on my blog.

April 10, 2010 Posted by | TV | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A lecture on love

For an assignment for my TV class in Journalism school we had to put together a package on love. I happened upon a facebook event that said Rabbi Yisroel Bernath was giving a lecture on love at the Chabad house in NDG, Montreal. So I went.

Please ignore my bridge in the middle, I prefer doing voice overs to being on camera myself!!

This is also posted on my blog.

April 2, 2010 Posted by | TV | , , , | Leave a comment

Bowling for Miracles

I had to put together a TV package on the theme of miracles. A friend of mine was putting together a great fundraiser and I thought, what’s more miraculous than babies who survive even when they’re born super early or who for some reason don’t seem like they’re going to make it?

This is also posted on my blog.

March 16, 2010 Posted by | TV | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sailing Free

Now playing: jmvdono

A radio documentary about Paula Stone and the AQVA – L’Association quebecoise de voile adaptee – recorded on location at the Point Claire Yacht Club in Montreal

November 24, 2009 Posted by | People, Radio | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Soldier’s Perspective

This is my radio documentary on the experiences of three Canadian soldiers who went to Afghanistan at least once. There are some edits I’d like to fix, maybe on a rainy day when I have time!

Anyway, hope you enjoy!

November 7, 2009 Posted by | People, Radio | , , , | Leave a comment

100 Best Blogs for Journalism Students

Here is the link to a list of Blogs that might be intriguing/useful, and not only for journalism students!

http://www.bachelorsdegreeonline.com/blog/2009/100-best-blogs-for-journalism-students/

September 8, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Montreal’s Folk Festival

My first radio assignment! I hadn’t brought my camera so I had to improvise with the images. They’re not terribly exciting but they give you something to look at. On youtube I list where I got the images (only a few of them are mine).

August 18, 2009 Posted by | Radio | , , , , | Leave a comment

‘A different breed of people’

July 23, 2009
Ball hockey players: ‘a different breed of people’
In the warm sun on a Sunday afternoon, Leo Donovan hoisted his unnaturally small hockey bag over his shoulder as he walked into the inconspicuous Le Rinque Arena and Sports Bar on chemin de la Cote-de-Liesse. Donovan’s FW Legends, in light blue, faced off against the Leftovers, in yellow jerseys, in what promised to be a good ball hockey game between the top two teams in the NABHL – Not Another Ball Hockey League.
In the first 15 minute period, running time, the even back and forth playing ended with the Leftovers leading 3-1. The momentum changed, however, as the Legends scored six goals in the second period, four within the last two minutes. The Legends won 10-3.
The second and third periods were full of great passing plays by the Legends. Donovan’s line accounted for five goals, most from passes fed across the crease by Adrian Humphreys to the waiting Francois Courion. Donovan scored with a nifty backhand on a pass from Courion.
The differences between ball and ice hockey were immediately apparent. With no blue lines there are only two zones and no offside rule. The refs have interesting techniques to keep out of the way. One ref jumped up and grabbed the top of the glass to hoist himself up and stand on the ledge.
“Ball hockey players are a difference breed of people,” said Jordan Topor, Legends player and co-owner of the almost two-year-old NABHL. “Ice hockey refs don’t enjoy reffing ball hockey. They get less respect.
“The players’s knowledge of the game is less than ice hockey players, and they think they can convince the ref to change the call,” sair Topor.
“It’s harder to deke,” said Chris Cormier, manager of the FW Legends. “You can cut easier on the ice.”
All of the players wear gloves and most wear either soccer or hockey shin pads strapped to their legs in various ways. A few wear mouthguards and only one wore a helmet.
“I don’t want to wear a helmet, but it’s a bit sketchy,” said Donovan, the youngest player on the team at 19, and one of the only players still playing junior-level organized hockey.
“I’ve seen people get their teeth knocked out.”
Even with little equipment, players show no mercy. They run hard into the boards and it can be “a bit chippy sometimes,” said Cormier. Big Legends defenseman Jason Clement fended off three yellow players against the boards after a rush, which ended in a mini shoving match after the whistle in the second period. The game was pretty clean, however, with only four 90 second penalties, mostly in the third.
Topor and Josh Naygeboren’s NABHL is quite the success. Their website, http://www.nabhl.com shows player and team statistics, top scorers, and suspensions, which the players enjoy. The two owners/players are looking to expand to another venue, said Topor after the game.
“We saw a huge need,” said Topor. “Before us, the only time people could play in a rink was in the summer.” Topor and Naygeboren put together the NABHL comprising of three seasons in a facility built specifically for ball and roller hockey with real boards, glass, and a specially made floor and smaller sized rink.
“It’s more about finesse because there isn’t much room,” said Cormier. “You have to rely on the team more and know where everyone is because you have less room to move around.”
Both Cormier and Donovan still prefer ice hockey but devoted ball hockey players take their game seriously. It is not just another kind of hockey but a sport unto itself.

July 23, 2009

Ball hockey players: ‘a different breed of people’

by Johanna Donovan

In the warm sun on a Sunday afternoon, Leo Donovan hoisted his unnaturally small hockey bag over his shoulder as he walked into the inconspicuous Le Rinque Arena and Sports Bar on chemin de la Cote-de-Liesse. Donovan’s FW Legends, in light blue, faced off against the Leftovers, in yellow jerseys, in what promised to be a good ball hockey game between the top two teams in the NABHL – Not Another Ball Hockey League.

In the first 15 minute period, running time, the even back-and-forth playing ended with the Leftovers leading 3-1. The momentum changed, however, as the Legends scored six goals in the second period, four within the last two minutes. The Legends won 10-3.

The second and third periods were full of great passing plays by the Legends. Donovan’s line accounted for five goals, most from passes fed across the crease by Adrian Humphreys to the waiting Francois Courion. Donovan scored with a nifty backhand on a pass from Courion.

The differences between ball and ice hockey were immediately apparent. With no blue lines there are only two zones and no offside rule. The refs have interesting techniques to keep out of the way. One ref jumped up and grabbed the top of the glass to hoist himself up and stand on the ledge.

“Ball hockey players are a different breed of people,” said Jordan Topor, Legends player and co-owner of the almost two-year-old NABHL. “Ice hockey refs don’t enjoy reffing ball hockey. They get less respect.

“The players’s knowledge of the game is less than ice hockey players, and they think they can convince the ref to change the call,” sair Topor.

“It’s harder to deke,” said Chris Cormier, manager of the FW Legends. “You can cut easier on the ice.”

All of the players wear gloves and most wear either soccer or hockey shin pads strapped to their legs in various ways. A few wear mouthguards and only one wore a helmet.

“I don’t want to wear a helmet, but it’s a bit sketchy,” said Donovan, the youngest player on the team at 19, and one of the only players still playing junior-level organized hockey.

“I’ve seen people get their teeth knocked out.”

Even with little equipment, players show no mercy. They run hard into the boards and it can be “a bit chippy sometimes,” said Cormier. Big Legends defenseman Jason Clement fended off three yellow players against the boards after a rush, which ended in a mini shoving match after the whistle in the second period. The game was pretty clean, however, with only four 90 second penalties, mostly in the third.

Topor and Josh Naygeboren’s NABHL is quite the success. Their website, http://www.nabhl.com shows player and team statistics, top scorers, and suspensions, which the players enjoy. The two owners/players are looking to expand to another venue, said Topor after the game.

“We saw a huge need,” said Topor. “Before us, the only time people could play in a rink was in the summer.” Topor and Naygeboren put together the NABHL comprising of three seasons in a facility built specifically for ball and roller hockey with real boards, glass, and a specially made floor and smaller sized rink.

“It’s more about finesse because there isn’t much room,” said Cormier. “You have to rely on the team more and know where everyone is because you have less room to move around.”

Both Cormier and Donovan still prefer ice hockey but devoted ball hockey players take their game seriously. It is not just another kind of hockey but a sport unto itself.

July 30, 2009 Posted by | People, Print | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wiihab, yes please!

July 6, 2009
Rehab, no thanks. Wiihab, yes please!
In a bright room called the Solarium at the Mackay Rehabilitation Centre and elementary school in NDG, the Wii console has to be locked up when not in use. “We have a problem with all the kids wanting to play it whenever they come in,” said Maria Angulo, a phsyiotherapist at the school.
Physical and occupational therapists at Mackay have been incorporating the Wii, donated by Nintendo, into the children’s therapy for a year. They use the technology to work on balance, range of motion, strengthening and fine motor control, to name a few, in a fun and new way.
“The idea is to give the kids another possibility to exercise, although they’ don’t think they’re exercising,” said Angulo. “It’s an alternative to formal or routine therapy and we are having really good results.”
The therapists assess the children and create a plan with particular goals to work on through the Wii. Most of the children who they work on have cerebral palsy, a condition marked by problems with the central nervous system. “It’s not a progressive disease but they can deteriorate over time if not treated,” said Angulo. Other children who benefit from Wiihab are those with neuromuscular diseases and spinal cord problems such as myelomeningocele, a defect that happens in the development of the central nervous system.
Not all the children at Mackay can use the Wii; it depends on the severity of their impairment. “They do need to have a certain intellectual level to use the Wii,” said Angulo.
“It’s not just that they can improve in one area of their physical abilities,” said Angulo. “It’s also the idea of playing a sport. It increases body image and self-esteem.”
Angulo and other therapists found out about the Wii as a tool for therapy from newspapers. There are many articles and forums and even a blog about WiiHab or Wiihabilitation on the internet, such as http://www.wiihabilitation.co.uk and http://wiihabtherapy.blogspot.com.
“A lot more people are involved and interested,” said Marianne Dutil, a Therapeute en Réadaptation Physique at Mackay. Some therapists, not being of the Nintendo generation, still shy away from the unfamiliar technology. “The kids will show you what you don’t know,” laughed Dutil.
Wiihab can be used for many disabilities, spinal cord injuries and other traumas. “One of our reverse integrated kids had a fracture,” said Angulo, speaking of one of the able-bodied students that can attend Mackay for up to two years. “We used the Wii to help strengthen his arm after the cast was removed, but we prioritize use of the Wii for the kids with the real need.”
Both Angulo and Dutil attended a seminar put on by the Institut de réadaptation de Montréal (IRM) in May. Jean-François Lemay, a physiotherapist with the IRM, is conducting research comparing the results from Wii therapy to the results from therapy with their more sophisticated machines. “The Wii as a therapy tool is working really well,” said Angulo. “I hope we will have the results from the research and be able to know if we are doing the right thing and see if the Wii can be reliable.”
There are still obstacles to using the technology in therapy. When using Wii Fit, it is difficult for those with standing balance problems to get onto the platform said Dutil. “The Wii tells them to stop fidgeting but they just don’t have postural control so their weight keeps changing.” Mackay therapists have had to create homemade adaptations to the Wii.
With Wiihabilitation’s growing popularity, there may be a market for adapted Wii consoles and equipment for therapy uses.

July 6, 2009

Rehab, no no no! Wiihab, yes please!

by Johanna Donovan

In a bright room called the Solarium at the Mackay Rehabilitation Centre and elementary school in NDG, the Wii console has to be locked up when not in use. “We have a problem with all the kids wanting to play it whenever they come in,” said Maria Angulo, a phsyiotherapist at the school.

Physical and occupational therapists at Mackay have been incorporating the Wii, donated by Nintendo, into the children’s therapy for a year. They use the technology to work on balance, range of motion, strengthening and fine motor control, to name a few, in a fun and new way.

“The idea is to give the kids another possibility to exercise, although they don’t think they’re exercising,” said Angulo. “It’s an alternative to formal or routine therapy and we are having really good results.”

The therapists assess the children and create a plan with particular goals to work on through the Wii. Most of the children who they work on have cerebral palsy, a condition marked by problems with the central nervous system. “It’s not a progressive disease but they can deteriorate over time if not treated,” said Angulo. Other children who benefit from Wiihab are those with neuromuscular diseases and spinal cord problems such as myelomeningocele, a defect that happens in the development of the central nervous system.

Not all the children at Mackay can use the Wii; it depends on the severity of their impairment. “They do need to have a certain intellectual level to use the Wii,” said Angulo.

“It’s not just that they can improve in one area of their physical abilities,” said Angulo. “It’s also the idea of playing a sport. It increases body image and self-esteem.”

Angulo and other therapists found out about the Wii as a tool for therapy from newspapers. There are many articles and forums and even a blog about WiiHab or Wiihabilitation on the internet, such as http://www.wiihabilitation.co.uk and http://wiihabtherapy.blogspot.com.

“A lot more people are involved and interested,” said Marianne Dutil, a Therapeute en Réadaptation Physique at Mackay. Some therapists, not being of the Nintendo generation, still shy away from the unfamiliar technology. “The kids will show you what you don’t know,” laughed Dutil.

Wiihab can be used for many disabilities, spinal cord injuries and other traumas. “One of our reverse integrated kids had a fracture,” said Angulo, speaking of one of the able-bodied students that can attend Mackay for up to two years. “We used the Wii to help strengthen his arm after the cast was removed, but we prioritize use of the Wii for the kids with the real need.”

Both Angulo and Dutil attended a seminar put on by the Institut de réadaptation de Montréal  (IRM) in May. Jean-François Lemay, a physiotherapist with the IRM, is conducting research comparing the results from Wii therapy to the results from therapy with their more sophisticated machines. “The Wii as a therapy tool is working really well,” said Angulo. “I hope we will have the results from the research and be able to know if we are doing the right thing and see if the Wii can be reliable.”

There are still obstacles to using the technology in therapy. When using Wii Fit, it is difficult for those with standing balance problems to get onto the platform said Dutil. “The Wii tells them to stop fidgeting but they just don’t have the postural control so their weight keeps changing.” Mackay therapists have had to create homemade adaptations to the Wii.

With Wiihabilitation’s growing popularity, there may be a market for adapted Wii consoles and equipment for therapy uses.

July 29, 2009 Posted by | Print | , , , | Leave a comment